No Series: Assessing Learning and Providing Feedback

Assessing Learning and Providing Feedback

Lesson Objective: Learn strategies for assessing learning and providing meaningful feedback while teaching online.
Webinar / Assessment / Distance Learning
56 MIN

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Discussion and Supporting Materials

Thought starters

  1. Do you prefer to design tests and quizzes at the beginning or end of a unit? Why?
  2. What is the difference between grading and feedback?
  3. Are you most comfortable offering written, verbal, or video feedback? How might you incorporate different feedback mediums in your teaching practice?

4 Comments

  • Private message to Debra Nemore

Just a suggestion, if teachers aren't comfortable with video feedback, there are so many animated apps that can animate you into a cartoon character.  That can limit your identifiability to social media outlets such as TikTok. 

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  • Private message to Ana Harston
  1. I prefer to design tests and quizzes at the beginning and the end of a unit because I like to check students concept and comprehension. A quiz cab be 5 questions or two. 
  2. The difference between grading and feedback is about growth and time. 
  3. I am comfortable with written and verbal feedback. I might you incorporate  video feeback, I know different feedback mediums in my teaching practice will help access all learners.
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  • Private message to Jaseema Begam

Formative assessments are certainly a key to identify where learners are in their learning cycle. Checking in often to check students' proficiency in the concepts will determine if they are ready for the summative assessment. And also provides opportunities to clear off any misconceptions I also believe in providing a wholesome learning experience rather than teaching to the summative assessment as it will significantly narrow down on the teaching & learning. The GREAT model was an eye-opener for giving feedback. It does open doors for students towards new learning. I will remember this for a long time in my teaching practice. Thank you.
G-growth producing, not criticism. R-real, not false praise. E-emphathetic. A-asked for, taught the learner to ask for feedback. T-timely

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  • Private message to Elizabeth Schaeffer

Perhaps an outline before so you keep on track of what you want to teach and create the test after you have taught your content.  Feedback seems much kinder and thorough for the student to know how to better evaluate themselves and it forces the teacher to really get to know the student and how they think.  I am most comfortable with verbal feedback, this feels more connected to the student and seeing the reactions of the student can also help guide you as to how to deliver the feedback.  I would incorporate verbal feedback first, then ask the student to write down what they learned from the feedback.  I would only do video feedback if a child was doing distance learning.

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