No Series: Boosting Engagement, Rigor, and Connection Online, Part 1

Boosting Engagement, Rigor, and Connection Online, Part 1

Lesson Objective: Learn strategies to increase engagement and participation while teaching in an online classroom.
Webinar / Engagement / Distance Learning

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Discussion and Supporting Materials

Thought starters

  1. At 6:20, we see teacher Denise Karratti beginning her online lesson. What are some strategies she uses to start class quickly?
  2. How do you maintain student engagement when teaching asynchronously?
  3. How does teacher Rachel Shin “dissolve the screen” in her lesson at 28:58?

7 Comments

  • Private message to Tsui-mei Tsai

1. Teacher Denise started her class with a very simple rules: 1. paper 2. pencil/pen 3. positive attitute; Expectation: 1. stay muted except you were called  2. Answer questions through chat box; amd she asked a question before the class: What do you know about percents. Keep classroom simple, visible, and a warm up question to exercise her rules and expectation really include the whole class into her class.

2. To maintain student engagement during asynchroneous assignments I have to make sure that the directions are easy to follow. Simplified a big questions into smaller sessions, let students follow one step at a time.

3. Teacher Rachel Shin use paper and pencil demonstration really takes away the anxiety of technology from the 1st grader.s She let students know that even during the remote learning, they can still complete their assignments through paper and pencils. This is a great comfort for our elementary students.

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  • Private message to Prince Worthington

This video was exceptionally well done. 

As a--soon to be--first year teacher this video really diminished some of the anxiety that I've been having about commandeering my own online class (in the era of a pandemic). However, Rachel Shin's excerpt showed me that the technology is merely a tool to get your message across, not the message itself. As long as an educator can meet the students where they are the format itself is incidental.

Again, this was a wonderful video! I enjoyed it immensely.

Recommended (1)
  • Private message to Yolanda Conner

This is exciting because I also welcome my class by calling my students by name as they enter our virtual class. I too set my expectations...stay on mute, have supplies ready etc. I also liked how she checked for prior knowledge with her "Wait Question". I use a "Do Now".

Asynchronous: We use Class Dojo and I like to shout out my students work in the "Class Story". Although the parents are sending in the work, I respond with a message, or feedback directed to the student. It keeps them excited about doing their best work and getting it in on time.

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  • Private message to Danielle Rivas

The use of pausing, writing on the board, and allowing students to watch the video in their own time/pace is helpful in allowing students to have a personalized learning experience. The warmth and excitement of the teacher is also a good way to foster student engagement and interest.

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  • Private message to Anna Kago

Rachel seems to enjoy her lesson and her joy is contagious. Standing and moving adds to "dissolving the screen" and students feel connected. 

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