Writing Higher Order Questions
Lesson Objective: Write discussion questions about texts
All Grades / ELA / Analysis

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Thought starters

  1. How does Ms. Francisco use Bloom's Taxonomy to help students write questions?
  2. What can you learn from Ms. Francisco about teaching multiple strategies?
  3. How does Ms. Francisco encourage students to use their personal reactions?
157 Comments

How does Ms. Francisco use Bloom's Taxonomy to help students write questions?

Ms.  F. uses multiple methods to find deeper questions.  The students had copies of Costa's Questions as well as an envelope wiht Bloom's starter cards.  The idea behind was for the students to use those resources to find more in depth questions... not just quick answer questions.

What can you learn from Ms. Francisco about teaching multiple strategies?

Ms. F. has the students keep track as they read.  I heard several methods mentioned: questioning, Frayer Model, and Lotus as a few.  This allows students to take the information they are getting and place in a method that works for them, thus teaching self differientiation.

How does Ms. Francisco encourage students to use their personal reactions?

Ms. F. wants the students to recognize their questioning moments.  The "ah ha" moments.  To realize that not everyone understands at the same time.  Good readers have questions and your personal response to those questions is how people improve their reading and comprehension.

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  1. How does Ms. Francisco use Bloom's Taxonomy to help students write questions?
    • She uses verb starter cards as a memory tool to aid students in writing higher level questions.
  2. What can you learn from Ms. Francisco about teaching multiple strategies?
    • By teaching multiple strategies, Ms. Francisco allows students to work within their comfort zone. This encourages them to excel through the levels of Bloom's taxonomy on their own.
  3. How does Ms. Francisco encourage students to use their personal reactions?
    • She taught the students to pay attention to the emotional connection they feel to what they read by having them highlight text that provided an "aha" or "wow" moment. These personal reactions to the text are then used as question starters.
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Love how she provided a few different strategies and then let them decide what worked best for them to formulate the question. 

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  1. How does Ms. Francisco use Bloom's Taxonomy to help students write questions?

Ms. Francisco uses Bloom’s Taxonomy in a couple of important ways. Overall, she is guiding the students to think in higher levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy by doing this project. They are moving beyond simply recognizing facts to creating questions by evaluating their responses to the text. As part of the activity, Ms. Francisco also gave students verbs at different levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy to inspire them to start questions. This allows students to self-differentiate but also encourages them to try harder because resources are discretely at their fingertips.

  1. What can you learn from Ms. Francisco about teaching multiple strategies?

Teaching students multiple strategies for completing the same task allow students, again, to self-differentiate. They are able to work on their individual levels of comfort at present while also being encouraged and empowered with resources to move “up” the levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy on their own. It also helps to ensure that students of different types of intelligence are more likely to have at least one strategy that will best connect with them.

  1. How does Ms. Francisco encourage students to use their personal reactions?

Students are encouraged to use their personal reactions to the text by Ms. Francisco helping students to identify those “aha” or “wow” moments in their reading. She also teaches them, as she said, that good readers will usually have questions to which they do not know the answer. In other words, she is teaching them that it’s okay to not know the answers to everything and to use that to provoke themselves to greater thought through identifying what naturally gets their attention in the text.

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These are great strategies for both students and teachers as they aim to write higher order thinking questions to challenge the ideas and push each other's thoughts. 

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Transcripts

  • ECET - Strategies Florida - Thristine Francisco - "Writing Higher Order Questions"
    Progam Transcript

    Thristine Francisco:
    Yesterday we read the chapters,

    ECET - Strategies Florida - Thristine Francisco - "Writing Higher Order Questions"
    Progam Transcript

    Thristine Francisco:
    Yesterday we read the chapters, few chapters in Iqbal, and we started to look at questions that we could ask to have a deeper understanding of the text.

    Francisco (Interview):
    There are several strategies that I use to help my students formulate higher order questions.

    Francisco:
    You had the opportunity to choose between the Frayer model, Costa's Levels of Questions, making observations based on the text, and verb starters.

    Francisco (Interview):
    Costa's Levels of Questions, that's the easiest thing to do, because you can pull those types of questions from the Costa's question starters in order to just connect those questions with that text.

    Francisco:
    What strategy did you use to write that question?

    Student:
    The verb starters.

    Francisco:
    Verb starters, okay.

    Francisco (Interview):
    I gave them envelopes with cards at different levels of Bloom's taxonomy questions, so we spent a lot of time using the verbs and whenever we had a text I would say, okay, if you need to use a resource of going and using the cards in order to know-- remember the verbs, I want you to go ahead and use that resource and I want you to write a question. In terms of the Frayer Model, they have a sheet of paper that's divided in four quadrants, and they're kind of examining the four quadrants to see what questions they may have they could learn from looking at that information. So I can kind of see it as a critical brainstorming tool.

    Francisco:
    What strategy did your partner use?

    Student:
    We used, um, notice.

    Francisco:
    Notice? Okay.

    Francisco (Interview):
    As they're reading, they make observations. They look for quotes, things that stand out, things that make them, um, go "ooh, ahh," things that make them feel as though-- that leads to a reaction inside. And they use that reaction that they have and they turn it into a question. I encourage them to see that reading the text, even though it's complex, even though it might seem difficult, that good readers have questions that they didn't know the answers to. Instead of having the teacher have all of the power, it gives the power to them, so really it's about empowering them.

School Details

Orange Grove Middle Magnet School
3415 North 16th Street
Tampa FL 33605
Population: 521

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