Series Inquiry-Based Teaching: Inquiry-Based Teaching: Encouraging Student Voice

Inquiry-Based Teaching: Encouraging Student Voice

Lesson Objective: Encourage student voice in class discussions
Grades 9-12 / All Subjects / Discussions
4 MIN

PLEASE CREATE A NEW ACCOUNT OR LOG IN TO ACCESS THIS CONTENT

Enjoy your first video for free. Subscribe for unlimited access.

Have questions about subscribing? Click Here to learn more.

Discussion and Supporting Materials

Thought starters

  1. How do students influence the questions that Mr. Barlowe asks?
  2. Consider how valuing student voice increases investment in discussions. How can you ensure that your students feel heard?
  3. How does Mr. Barlowe encourage both personal and analytical responses to texts?

12 Comments

  • Private message to Vonetta Wideman
The kids drive the lesson and discussion...This is making me so happy. We need to know what they think and yes we need the voice that is analytical and personal as well. Their questions and comments make me think as a teacher and cause me to build more student involved lessons. Inquiry based lessons are a must in this day and time. Students giving reasoning as to why they think the way that they think. Some of these lesson could become very heated and I like that as long as there is genuine respect just like the happenings going on in this video. I commend this teacher for asking questions and letting his student just take it away. We get to hear their voice and also hear what they are thinking.
Recommended (0)
  • Private message to Adam Hopson
Teachers have to approach discussions like these as though they're coaching students how to think about certain issues personally but with always an analytical eye on important facts. I think a good way to coordinate the discussion is to invite students to challenge ideas or comments on analytical, factual grounds as opposed to personal biases.
Recommended (0)
  • Private message to Ian Zamora
I think that engaging students in this way definitely needs some guiding or directed questions, but allowing the conversation to flow in various directions is what will be key. I also believe that with such a topic as this, having a classroom environment that allows such discussion will be key.
Recommended (0)
  • Private message to Nancy Bethea
How and when do you help kids with reading comprehension deficits at this school?
Recommended (0)
  • Private message to Colo NESCO
Student pov.
Recommended (0)

Transcripts

  • WNET / UCH Urban Academy
    “Exploring Powerful Ideas Inquiry-Based Teaching: Discussing a Teachers Role”
    ENCOURAGING STUDENT VOICE

    STUDENT:
    So what happens

    WNET / UCH Urban Academy
    “Exploring Powerful Ideas Inquiry-Based Teaching: Discussing a Teachers Role”
    ENCOURAGING STUDENT VOICE

    STUDENT:
    So what happens with people who commit treason? Right now.

    AVRAM BARLOWE:
    Right now?

    STUDENT:
    Yeah right now.

    AVRAM BARLOWE:
    Today?

    STUDENT:
    Yeah.

    AVRAM BARLOWE:
    What happens with people who are convicted of treason?

    STUDENT:
    Like, do they get sentenced how long? It’s a felony, right?

    AVRAM BARLOWE:
    It’s more than a felony. Tr-treason, treason you could be executed for treason.

    STUDENT:
    Oh, okay. So and I feel, um, that all these people committed treason so why couldn’t they just be executed?

    (in roundtable)
    AVRAM BARLOWE:
    The thing we see about student voice in all these clips are what the kids say drives the lessons. Right? Your questions are nothing if the kids don’t say things so that their comments and the framing of their comments and comparing of their comments, their response to each other comments- it’s, you know, that’s what drives the discussion as much as anything the teacher does. They’re reacting to the text based on things that they know, things that they’ve learned, um, things that they think. But they’re also analyzing at the same time and that’s the voice we want. We want the voice that, that is deeply personal but is also analytical.

    (in class)
    STUDENT:
    We can say, “We think, we think, we think” but even when they were in the war and they were taking the black hostages in the South, nothing was done when they were being killed and put back into slavery so what makes us think that they’d do anything against these, um, racist attitudes in the country. Like, we’re not even saying that they emancipated the slaves because that’s what they wanted to do but as a, like a, as a war tactic or whatever. So, I don’t think its as important as we’re making it seem to everyone else.

    AVRAM BARLOWE:
    There’s two questions. Would it have been a good idea, in theory, to kill all of these people and the second question is would it have gotten any support in 1865?

    (in roundtable)

    ADAM GRUMBACH:
    The way you framed the question is you took Saloul’s question and made it two questions-

    AVRAM BARLOWE:
    Yes.

    ADAM GRUMBACH:
    One: would it have made sense to execute everybody? And two: would it have been politically possible with some support for that kind of thing?

    AVRAM BARLOWE:
    I, you know, sometimes you can over do this but I wanted kids to sort of remember the first question even as she’s begging a second question.

    ADAM GRUMBACH:
    I also think it’s a – you differentiated the lesson in that moment. The first question, anybody can respond to. Is it morally right? Is it okay to kill everybody? And Ezra was mostly responding to that. And then the second ones were bringing around like what can you show, what can you use to show what wouldn’t have made sense or wouldn’t have been politically feasible.

    AVRAM BARLOWE:
    But again you know, what’s interesting is that my questions come from the kids co- We’re working together there. I think people, I think, you know, it’s a false notion to conceive of… teachers work is, you want, you know whats in their that you want to extract out and your quest is to just go in there and pull out what you want.

    *** TAPE END ***
    *** TRANSCRIPT END ***

School Details

Urban Academy Laboratory High School
317 East 67th Street
New York NY 10065
Population: 155

Data Provided By:

greatschools

Teachers

Sheila Kosoff
Avram Barlowe
Terry Weber
Adam Grumbach

Newest

TCH Special
|
46 MIN

Webinar / Teacher Wellness / Summer Learning

TCH Special
|

Webinar / SEL / Leadership

TCH Special
|

Webinar / SEL / Professional Learning

TCH Special
|
45 MIN

Webinar / Professional Learning / Resources

TCHERS' VOICE

Summer Learning

TCHERS' VOICE

Lesson Planning

TCHERS' VOICE

English Language Arts