No Series: Approaches to Poetry: Pre-Reading Strategies

ELA.RL.8.4

Common core State Standards

  • ELA:  English Language Arts
  • RL:  Reading Standards for Literature 6รข\x80\x9312
  • 8:  8th Grade
  • 4: 
    Determine the meaning of words and phrases
    as they are used in a text, including figurative
    and connotative meanings; analyze the impact
    of specific word choices on meaning and tone,
    including analogies or allusions to other texts.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

Approaches to Poetry: Pre-Reading Strategies

Lesson Objective: Students analyze words of a poem before seeing the big picture
Grades 6-12 / ELA / Tone & Theme
6 MIN
ELA.RL.8.4

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Discussion and Supporting Materials

Thought starters

  1. See how isolating key words prior to reading the poem help students explore themes and make predictions How do the "spotting patterns" and "jumbled lines" tasks engage students in deep analysis?
  2. How does this approach make a complex poem easier to grasp?

100 Comments

  • Private message to Danyale Davis

1. The "spotting patterns" and "jumbled lines" tasks engage students in deep analysis by causing the to really pay attention to the words and their meaning to gain a better undersatanding of what the poem is actualy about. The students can make inferences based on the words that they do have from the poem.

2. This approach makes a complex poem easier to grasp by scaffolding, the students discussed the word meanings and use that to make connections with other words throughout the poem. The students were able to engage in a discussion and justify why they came up with their conclusions about the poem.

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  • Private message to Carolyn Havard

They can talk it over with another student. THey have a good understanding of what all the words and their meanings. They then can connect the two with a subject. Once they have quite of few words, they can try and piece them together and come up with a possibility of what the poem is. This lets the students minds process more than just a poem as a whole.

They can get a different understanding of the poem. Instead of a whole peom, they can take what they have and explore more possibilities. 

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  • Private message to Shaina Champagne

1. This help students explore poetry in a structured and fun way. It helps them break it down and gain a better understanding. When students feel they can make connections they feel confident and become more open. 

2. By breaking the poem down and putting the poem back together students are able to scaffold and build their understanding. This learning method is fun and when students are having fun and engaged they retain more. 

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  • Private message to Cristal Salinas

  • See how isolating keywords before reading the poem help students explore themes and make predictions. How do the "spotting patterns" and "jumbled lines" tasks engage students in deep analysis?
    • Spotting patterns of words used in the poem help students use these contexts to make predictions of their reading. Alongside the jumbled line task, the students work making inferences about the poem. With these two tasks, students worked actively to understand the meaning of words of the poem by using their background knowledge to assist them in understanding.
  • How does this approach make a complex poem easier to grasp?
    • The approaches used gave students the ability to grasp the meaning of the poem. The students were able to have a higher order of thinking. The students completed each task with a discussion of the context with peers' relevant conclusions to the teacher. 
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Transcripts

  • Summary

    Year 10 English pupils explore William Blake's poem, London, in an usual and innovative way. Suitable for Key Stage 4

    Summary

    Year 10 English pupils explore William Blake's poem, London, in an usual and innovative way. Suitable for Key Stage 4 exam preparation.
    Lead teacher in English and ICT, Carol Weale at Dane Court Grammar School, doesn't give her Year 10 class William Blake's complete London poem but places the words in alphabetical order.
    By isolating key words, the students begin to explore the themes. Carol then presents them with completed lines of London but in a jumbled order. They must rearrange them, using their knowledge of the poems rhyme structure and themes.
    Finally, students compete to memorize and write down as many words from the poem as possible, in a few minutes.
    This largely independent lesson is a great way to encourage and engage reluctant learners and help them to prepare them, for the unseen poetry paper.

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