Series Primary Music: Primary Music: Make Your Own Fanfare

Primary Music: Make Your Own Fanfare

Lesson Objective: Students work in groups to compose a fanfare using only 3 notes
Grades 3-5 / Music / Composition

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Discussion and Supporting Materials

Thought starters

  1. Why is it helpful to link this lesson with history?
  2. Why did Ms. Foster limit the composition to 3 notes and 4 bars?
  3. What is the significance of the self-evaluation questions?

5 Comments

  • Private message to Clare Dardis

This is a nice way to do a lesson on composition in just one class period. I like how the restrictions on the composition will help all students to come up with a successful piece. I also thought it was a good idea to give them phrases to write rhythms for. Finally, I like that students have to write their composition down with standard music notation. 

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  • Private message to James Wetzel
Her written rhythm for "Here comes the king," is wrong.
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  • Private message to Chirag Gupta

Had the same thought. Maybe they have not yet introduced the dotted-eighth + sixteenth rhythm?

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  • Private message to JESUS TOPETE
Nicely done, thanks for sharing!
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  • Private message to Jeannine Berube
Liked the way the short parameters of the composition helped students focus on the task. Lots of integration between subjects and creative processes.
Recommended (0)

External Resource Materials

Transcripts

  • Summary

    A Key Stage 2 class compose a Tudor fanfare on the recorder as part of a music lesson linked to

    Summary

    A Key Stage 2 class compose a Tudor fanfare on the recorder as part of a music lesson linked to a larger history project, in this cross-curriculum lesson planning idea.
    First, teacher Jessica Foster demonstrates on the piano what a fanfare sounds like and the pupils discuss what a fanfare would be used for.
    The pupils are given a very tight structure from which to work from in order to keep the composing very simple and therefore achievable in one lesson.
    By only allowing three notes and four bars of music the pupils remain focused on the task. In pairs or small groups the children take their recorders and compose a Tudor fanfare.
    At the end of the lesson the pupils perform their fanfares in front of the whole class. The class discuss whether they achieved what they intended and what they would do if they weren't limited by just the recorder and only 15 minutes to compose the whole tune.

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