No Series: Structure & Engagement in Drama Class

Structure & Engagement in Drama Class

Lesson Objective: Impact behavior with lesson structure, content and classroom rapport
Grades 9-12 / Drama / Behavior
8 MIN

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Discussion and Supporting Materials

Thought starters

  1. How is behavior management in a drama class similar to and different from other classes?
  2. How does the lesson structure and the material used prevent behavior problems?
  3. When and why does Mr. Druker choose not to redirect off-task behavior?

7 Comments

  • Private message to Michael Burnett
  1. How is behavior management in a drama class similar to and different from other classes?
    There are still expectations for the classroom behavior, but they are modified to fit the uniqueness of a drama class.  Rather than the expectation of everyone sitting at a desk upon arrival, the teacher has a semicircle of chairs...similar expectation but different arrangement.  Things like noise level are also modified. In other classes, a low level of noise is the threshold whereas in a drama class a higher level of noise is expected and allowed.
  2. How does the lesson structure and the material used prevent behavior problems?
    By having students work in smaller groups, students are more willing to be engaged participants and thus keeps the behaviour problems down.  Also, by having work that is interesting and engaging to the students, even if it is a little on the riskier side, this allows for more student buy-in and keeps issues minimal.
  3. When and why does Mr. Druker choose not to redirect off-task behavior?
    If there is an issue that may be just an annoyance to him, but not to the rest of the class he chooses to let it go for the moment.  This is important because during some moments in class, during a performance for instance, if he chose to redirect a misbehaiving student it would distract from the performance and the other students' watching of it.  
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  • Private message to Brannon Boswell

Great class! Behavior management in a theatre class is different because of the nature of the class, the students are typically up on their feet, they're communicating, trying things... but that doesn't mean it is not organized, and in full control of the teacher. I think the teacher in this video had a very clear structure of how his class ran by utilizing rituals.  They students knew how to enter, and prepare for their class.  The teacher also had clearly given the students his expectations, and was very quick to remind them when they were off task. I think he redirected off task behavior when it became a major distraction to his teaching and the class.  He let go of the small things, in favor of maintaining that particular classes daily goals. 

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  • Private message to Amy Hanna
IT would be GREAT for my evaluators to understand the organized chaos that we theatre teachers THRIVE IN!!
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  • Private message to Fernando Pisani
Hi Julia, thanks for your answer. I'm in Brazil so it will be impossible for me to watch this one!
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  • Private message to Julia Chope
Hey Fernando - There are a couple of things that might help. First, make sure your Adobe Flash player and your browser are running the most recent versions. Another thing is that this particular video was acquired from TTV in the UK and our license does not allow us to play it outside of the US. If neither of these things are the problem, send us a feedback ticket by clicking the black feedback tab on the right side of the page, and we can troubleshoot further.
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