No Series: English and Black History: Reading "Roll of Thunder"

ELA.SL.8.1a

Common core State Standards

  • ELA:  English Language Arts
  • SL:  Speaking and Listening Standards 6-12
  • 8:  8th Grade
  • 1a: 
    Engage effectively in a range of collaborative
    discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacherled)
    with diverse partners on grade 8 topics,
    texts, and issues, building on others'\x80\x99 ideas and
    expressing their own clearly.

    a. Come to discussions prepared, having read
    or researched material under study; explicitly
    draw on that preparation by referring to
    evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe
    and reflect on ideas under discussion.


    b. Follow rules for collegial discussions and
    decision-making, track progress toward
    specific goals and deadlines, and define
    individual roles as needed.

    c. Pose questions that connect the ideas of
    several speakers and respond to others'
    questions and comments with relevant
    evidence, observations, and ideas.

    d. Acknowledge new information expressed
    by others, and, when warranted, qualify or
    justify their own views in light of the evidence
    presented.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

English and Black History: Reading "Roll of Thunder"

Lesson Objective: Students examine elements of the American Civil Rights Movement
Grades 6-8 / ELA / History
ELA.SL.8.1a

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Discussion and Supporting Materials

Thought starters

  1. What types of questions does Ms. Marquis pose to guide students in analyzing Roll of Thunder?
  2. How does "micro-teaching" by students make the lesson more meaningful?
  3. Notice that students complete additional research to prepare for "micro-teaching"?

8 Comments

  • Private message to Ashley Minnick

She makes sure to ask the students critical thinking questions. After students answer questions, she asks them another one to build on their response more. Having students do research on their own time makes the lesson more personal to them. I like how she left it up to the students how they chose to present the information they learned. Having peers teach lessons to the class allows for a different approach to teaching and the students may retain that information more. 

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  • Private message to Shay Centilli

I think this teacher does an awesome job on allowing her to students to not only answer new questions but also answer the old questions from the day before or lesson before that ties into this lesson. She is making sure they are retaining the information given. The micro-teaching is a great tool to use in a classroom to allow the students "become the teachers" and it makes the classroom dynamic important to listen and research your own information for your presentation and questions coming up and when you listen, it seemed like some students passed out candy for correct answers. Awesome tool!

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  • Private message to LaSonya Nelson
  1. Reflection: What types of questions does Ms. Marquis pose to guide students in analyzing Roll of Thunder?

-Critical thinking questions to help students have a better understanding in what the symbolism and meaning of the novel.

  1. How does "micro-teaching" by students make the lesson more meaningful?
  2. – Micro teaching helps because you can see what the students is grasping and their thoughts on the novel.
  3. Notice that students complete additional research to prepare for "micro-teaching"?
    • Having primary resource to support your argument will help with any discussions on the novel to help defend points of reason.
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  • Private message to Lan Pham

 

It is a great lesson that Ms. Marquis gives her students. In order to help all the students obtain the learning objectives, she uses guided questions with not only “What” and “Where” questions but also “How” and “Why” ones to gain her students' engagement, improve their critical thinking skills so that they can analyze the story better. The students will get a deeper understanding of the setting, the plot, the characters, and the theme of the story.

Moreover, Ms. Marquis applies a very effective strategy in her teaching by letting her students do the “micro-teaching”. The students in groups 3 or 4 work like teachers to give a presentation, ask questions, get the answers from their friends in class, and decide whether their answers are correct. To do these jobs, the students need to prepare well for the group presentation, and each has to do the research on one plot element of the story for more information and details. This requires them to analyze the elements thoroughly and have critical thinking skills as well as creativeness, which makes the lesson more meaningful and effective.

 

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  • Private message to andrew patmon

I think she does a great job of making sure the students are realizing the main points of the book or chapter by asking them questions directed in the right direction but still letting them answer themselves.  Really important to have the students go and do research on their own to make sure they are truly engaged in the book and letting them express themselves about the topic which will give them a better understanding.  She also spoke on the importance of having primary sources for students to learn, and used the reward system to help keep the other students engaged.

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