No Series: Leprechaun Traps (Uncut)

Math.Practice.MP2

Common core State Standards

  • Math:  Math
  • Practice:  Mathematical Practice Standards
  • MP2:  Reason abstractly and quantitatively.


    Mathematically proficient students make sense of quantities and their relationships in problem situations. They bring two complementary abilities to bear on problems involving quantitative relationships: the ability to decontextualize--to abstract a given situation and represent it symbolically and manipulate the representing symbols as if they have a life of their own, without necessarily attending to their referents—and the ability to contextualize, to pause as needed during the manipulation process in order to probe into the referents for the symbols involved. Quantitative reasoning entails habits of creating a coherent representation of the problem at hand; considering the units involved; attending to the meaning of quantities, not just how to compute them; and knowing and flexibly using different properties of operations and objects.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

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Math.Practice.MP3

Common core State Standards

  • Math:  Math
  • Practice:  Mathematical Practice Standards
  • MP3:  Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

    Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and--if there is a flaw in an argument--explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

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Math.1.NBT.C.4

Common core State Standards

  • Math:  Math
  • 1:  Grade 1
  • NBT:  Number & Operations in Base Ten
  • C:  Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract
  • 4: 
    Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

Leprechaun Traps (Uncut)

Lesson Objective: This is 89 minutes of authentic teaching, unedited, and without teacher narration.
Grades K-2 / Math / Reasoning
1 HR 29 MIN
Math.Practice.MP2 | Math.Practice.MP3 | Math.1.NBT.C.4

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Discussion and Supporting Materials

Thought starters

  1. What You'll See: Common Core examples, place values, counting by 10s, story problem, manipulatives, collaboration, real-world connections?

4 Comments

  • Private message to Joann Miller

She does a great job engaging the students with numbers and counting by 10’s. She is also introducing “decomposing” for figuring out the math answer.  They are learning adding numbers to units of tens to come up with an answer.  She does a great job giving everyone an opportunity to attempt an answer to be sure they are all understanding the lesson. When a student misses an answer, she does not make them feel bad for missing it.  She has them work through it to get the correct answer. It was great seeing the kids use manipulators then draw their answer on paper for containers with traps.  I love her use of technology for working the math problems on the board!

Recommended (1)
  • Private message to ELIZABETH CLEMENT

love how she engages the kids and asks them questions that encourage higher levels of thinking. She tries to involve all the kids and uses different ways to teach the same thing. Love the program she is using! Wish I had it. 

Recommended (1)
  • Private message to Julio Jacobo-Martinez

The way the teacher started the lesson engaging the students was very creative. She reviewed place value by relating the warm up activity to the actual number of school days the kids have attended making a connection to real world problems. The smart board it’s a great tool, allowing the kids to use technology in the classroom promoting student engagement. The students have great reasoning behind the critical questions the teacher asked. The use of the base ten cubes/linking cubes helped the students grasp the concept faster. Giving the students the ability to express what they’re thinking in whatever way they can was helpful foe the success of the lesson. The closure of the lesson was great, helping with any misconception the students still had after the activity.

Recommended (1)
  • Private message to Brianna Dusek

I love this so much! This teacher allows each student to express their creativity in so many way. She even gives them the chance to express it in how they learn. I love how math can be creative, expressive, and personal. I love how she pairs them up to find a solution to the problem but still also allows them to come to a conclusion all on their own. The students have a great sense of cohesion and expressiveness. Love how they are so willing to share in front of the class and help one another.

Recommended (1)

School Details

Cypress Creek Elementary School
6100 South Williamson Boulevard
Port Orange FL 32128
Population: 809

Data Provided By:

greatschools

Teachers

Jeanne Wright

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42 MIN

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58 MIN

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56 MIN

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45 MIN

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