No Series: Number Talks in Second Grade (Uncut)

Math.Practice.MP1

Common core State Standards

  • Math:  Math
  • Practice:  Mathematical Practice Standards
  • MP1:  Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

    Mathematically proficient students start by explaining to themselves the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution. They analyze givens, constraints, relationships, and goals. They make conjectures about the form and meaning of the solution and plan a solution pathway rather than simply jumping into a solution attempt. They consider analogous problems, and try special cases and simpler forms of the original problem in order to gain insight into its solution. They monitor and evaluate their progress and change course if necessary. Older students might, depending on the context of the problem, transform algebraic expressions or change the viewing window on their graphing calculator to get the information they need. Mathematically proficient students can explain correspondences between equations, verbal descriptions, tables, and graphs or draw diagrams of important features and relationships, graph data, and search for regularity or trends. Younger students might rely on using concrete objects or pictures to help conceptualize and solve a problem. Mathematically proficient students check their answers to problems using a different method, and they continually ask themselves, \"Does this make sense?\" They can understand the approaches of others to solving complex problems and identify correspondences between different approaches.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

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Math.Practice.MP3

Common core State Standards

  • Math:  Math
  • Practice:  Mathematical Practice Standards
  • MP3:  Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

    Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and--if there is a flaw in an argument--explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

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Math.2.NBT.B.5

Common core State Standards

  • Math:  Math
  • 2:  Grade 2
  • NBT:  Number & Operations in Base Ten
  • B:  Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract
  • 5: 
    Fluently add and subtract within 100 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

Number Talks in Second Grade (Uncut)

Lesson Objective: This is 51 minutes of authentic teaching, unedited, and without teacher narration.
Grade 2 / Math / ELL
Math.Practice.MP1 | Math.Practice.MP3 | Math.2.NBT.B.5

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Discussion and Supporting Materials

Thought starters

  1. What You'll See: Student led number talk Sentence frames Group roles Subtraction strategies Student reflection?

5 Comments

  • Private message to Joann Miller

I liked how she grouped and assigned everyone with a different roles  She had them work in groups to try and solve the math problem using different math strategies.  She had students talk about the different strategies and which method worked best for them.  I do not feel the class walked away with a clear understanding or solution of how to solve the math problem however they did walk away with good feedback as to not to interrupt their classmates or the teacher when talking.  Overall, I felt she did a great job keeping the kids involved.

Recommended (0)
  • Private message to Ayleen Gomez

I really like how she was making sure she had the students interact with her. I also like how she made sure to help those who needed it. When they were in groups she would go to the groups to watch them do what they were doing and helping the students if needed. Asking the students to solve the problems in different ways, can help those who may not know how to solve problems when needing to subtract or to help them find an easier way to get to the answer. When she was asking her students to give her feedback, the way she did it seemed like a good way. When the students were giving feedback about another classmate, she told them to look and talk to them, this can help students learn the way they need to talk to each other. Overall, the way she did things in her classroom seems like it works very well for her, and can even work for others if they wanted to teach the same way she did.

Recommended (0)
  • Private message to Brianna Dusek

I love how she did a refresher in number talk so they could then build on that foundation for the lesson. Dividing them up in small groups and partners will continually build oral language skills and allow them to build on group cooperation skils. The students were very engaged in the lesson and were very attentive. I love that they repeat the rules for the lesson. I love the patients she has and how attentive she is to her students, especially David, who might need a little more direction to get to what she is looking for.

Recommended (0)
  • Private message to Sandra Dominguez

I loved how she did an overview of a number talk, then divided them into small group. Then each person in the small group had a job. The students were engaged and using great number talk. She did a great job with David at the end!

Recommended (0)
  • Private message to Marianna Mushailov

Is there a transcript of this full lesson? 

Recommended (0)

School Details

Acorn Woodland Elementary School
1025 81st Avenue
Oakland CA 94621
Population: 292

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