No Series: Periodic Table: Ferocious Elements

Periodic Table: Ferocious Elements

Lesson Objective: Make the periodic table come alive and make sense for students
Grades 9-12 / Science / Chemistry
14 MIN

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Discussion and Supporting Materials

Thought starters

  1. How does using real-world examples help students understand patterns and characteristics of element families?
  2. See how to use the periodic table as a visual learning tool How does the organization of the periodic table help us make predictions?

3 Comments

  • Private message to kijjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjgtoesu nbeo4hy6kfdijgpsehtia[jwzfp

bruh this video is so old that Nh - Og dont even exist lmao

Recommended (0)
  • Private message to Patti Schaefer
This resource looked great at first. Then, it came to the experiment of sodium in water. The narrator said, the sodium was "melting" in the water. How disappointing to find an interesting video with completely inaccurate representation of a chemistry concept.
Recommended (1)
  • Private message to Tina Savoie
I teach at a school that does not have chemicals, therefore, no chemical demonstrations to WOW my students. This video sums up what I teach about the periodic table with supporting resources, especially the link to Periodic Nexus, that helps with the explanations of the properties of the table and has a an awesome table depicting the different families. I usually have my students color a blank periodic table as we learn how to label to table. This is a perfect visual of a completed project. This is a really effective one stop shopping spot for how I teach. Tina Savoie, South Cameron High School, Grand Chenier, LA
Recommended (1)

Transcripts

  • Summary

    There are more than 100 elements in our universe, 81 of which are metals.
    In this programme, we use the

    Summary

    There are more than 100 elements in our universe, 81 of which are metals.
    In this programme, we use the periodic table to explore some of these elements and discover why some are more reactive than others.
    Science teacher Subathra Subramaniam visits Portobello Road market in London and learns why gold, silver and copper are ideal for making jewellery.
    She also examines the highly reactive alkali metals, which are found in group one of the periodic table. She looks at their characteristic, reactions and uses.
    Finally, Subathra explores halogens, a collection of non-metals found in group seven of the periodic table, that display their own qualities and trends.
    Elsewhere, Professor Holloway of Leicester University, demonstrates how nasty and reactive the non-metal fluorine can be.
    He shows how each of the halogens reacts with hydrogen and explains how there are a number of good uses for this type of element.

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