No Series: Student-Generated Questions for Exam Prep

Student-Generated Questions for Exam Prep

Lesson Objective: Students generate and analyze questions for their upcoming exam
Grades 9-12 / Math / Assessment

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Discussion and Supporting Materials

Thought starters

  1. How does Jennifer's strategy of having students develop their own questions help prepare them for the upcoming exam?
  2. What does Jennifer mean by the right answer is great but so is the wrong answer?
  3. How does this approach increase student engagement and accountability?

5 Comments

  • Private message to Beverly sayer
Using student generated questions would be very helpful in our subject. We use some math for chemical mixing but having the students create questions would open many discussions for them.
Recommended (0)
  • Private message to Ram Pai
Hi Jennifer, What a co-incidence! Sometime back in my free time I had developed a web app that automated this idea of student generated tests. In fact, this web-app goes a level further where students can organize as a team and come up with a insightful quiz question, which they can then use it to challenge other teams. Each team contributes a question. All the teams than can collaborate and compete with each other to come solve the maximum number of questions. All done under the watchful eyes of the teacher. The teacher has the capability to modify/edit the questions of each team, before they are exposed to all the teams. I did present this idea and the tool to a local school over here in Oregon. But somehow they did not get excited about it and then I dropped pursuing it. If you think this tool will benefit you I am willing to make the tool suite your exact needs. Please email me and I will give you the link to my webapp. I suppose teaching channel will be able to provide you my email. Don't want to expose it here in public.
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  • Private message to Becca Kreidler
I enjoyed her strategies a lot, particularly the leveled group work and students-teaching-students approach. I wonder how students' questions would have been different if she had spent some of the time in class helping kids to write the questions. If the intent is to help students study for math, being able to generate "test-like" questions would be a pretty powerful approach. If some of her class time could have been dedicated to that part of the process, it might be more powerful for more students.
Recommended (0)
  • Private message to Lawrence Cisneroz
I agree with the below response. Using questions that are generated from the students for their test prep. I definitely would love for my students to come up with questions for an exam. Great video.
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  • Private message to Laura Hester
Great video. I love student generated questions. I also constantly tell my students that you often learn more from mistakes than success. The lead in to students identifying mistakes in order to solve the equation was great. These concepts can be used for any grade level! Wonderful presentation
Recommended (1)

Transcripts

  • TEACHING CHANNEL
    INTERVIEW WITH JENNIFER GIUDICE

    JENNIFER GIUDICE:
    We are gonna start today by simply having you guys take out your

    TEACHING CHANNEL
    INTERVIEW WITH JENNIFER GIUDICE

    JENNIFER GIUDICE:
    We are gonna start today by simply having you guys take out your homework from last night. You had a few problems that you were finishing up with factoring on page 260.
    (interview)
    My name's Jennifer Giudice. I am a math teacher at Staples High School in Westport, Connecticut. Today’s lesson really serves two purposes. The mathematical purpose is we were reviewing quadratics. We’ve been looking at the graphs and changing the forms. Also sort of considering domain and range and dealing with interval notation. I also wanted in today's lesson for the students to get some exposure to how to prepare for a math test. I get a lot of feedback of kids saying, I don't really know how to study. How do I study for this?
    (class)
    You guys are sitting the way you're sitting today for a reason. You are going to work in groups today based on your homework from last night. So, by 10 p.m. last night, all of you had to email me your two possible test questions, which I must say, some of you were really good and some of you were pretty hard on your peers.
    (interview)
    Yesterday in class I gave them a relatively traditional assignment, to factor some problems, but then with that, they were also assigned to go home and come up with two questions for their peers around the topics that we've been doing, to assist in the review. And they knew that I would be compiling them. Some students really did ask those conceptual questions, to really get at, do you understand exactly what we're doing with quadratics. Obviously those are the ones that I selected. When they write a problem, they're thinking about it differently. They're putting it together -- hopefully it's challenging -- and they have to think about not only what am I asking, but how am I going to solve it, how are other students going to approach it. Everyone has three questions, and they are all different. Each group is different. OK? You’re gonna complete all three of them, but I want you to do it a little less traditionally. I want you to solve them according to the directions, but then, amongst your small group, I want you to discuss how you might study for this type of question on a test or a quiz. And then the first question in every group is starred, and we're gonna go through each of the first questions as a whole group, and each group will present their question and sort of their findings.
    STUDENT 1:
    OK, so, what the answer should have been is three, and then in parentheses, X-comp, plus 5x plus...
    STUDENT 2:
    You know, you could do the -B/2A to find it if you wanted, but that's even too much work.
    JENNIFER GIUDICE:
    I have them work in groups because I want them to hear other people's opinions and other students' ideas, and I want them to see that other students aren't sure how to approach it as well. They’re not alone.
    STUDENT 3:
    I just got confused. Like remember that first worksheet we had, where it was like, is it vertex or intercept. I got every single one wrong.
    JENNIFER GIUDICE:
    I’ve always told me students that the right answer is great, but so is the wrong answer, because oftentimes, if a student gives a wrong answer, the richness of the class conversation is unbelievable.
    (class)
    Even if you are not quite done, I want you to turn your attention up to the front.
    STUDENT 4:
    So we were looking at the error, and I’ll admit at first I was really confused, but then they pointed out that his foiling wasn't correct.
    JENNIFER GIUDICE:
    They were concerned about their ability to foil correctly and to deal with the power with the binomial and things like that. So I had a number of students write, do a question where, OK, here's a student response, this is what they gave the teacher. What went wrong?
    (class)
    So ultimately you guys ended up with -3x-squared + 12x - 4, correct? Good, so they found basically an arithmetic error in that you really have to be careful when you're changing forms that you follow your order of operations. Good job. Thanks, ladies.
    (interview)
    That really caused them to have to reflect on what was happening. It was more than just doing it. They had to identify what went wrong, had to explain why it went wrong, and then correct it. So it really does sort of push them beyond just a traditional complete-the-following.
    STUDENT 5:
    So we sensed the second x equals two. We decided that four, negative two would be the best answer. So...that's what we got.
    JENNIFER GIUDICE:
    Good. And just set that. Do y-equals for that one. Perfect. So they went from vertex to intercept one. OK?
    (interview)
    When they do get into a test situation, if there's a question that they're not as familiar with, they will have the confidence to step back from it and think, wait, I know a lot about quadratics, I don't know exactly the answer to this, but what can I put together and piece together to get where I’m going. This is the first experience they've had writing questions. I will do this sort of activity again throughout the year, and it's always interesting to see how the questions change as time goes on.
    (class)
    All right you guys. I’m going to give you about two more minutes to wrap these up.

    * * *END OF AUDIO* * *
    * * *END OF TRANSCRIPT* * *

School Details

Staples High School
70 North Avenue
Westport CT 06880
Population: 1885

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Jennifer Giudice

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