No Series: Collaborative Thought: A Tool to Sharpen Learning

Collaborative Thought: A Tool to Sharpen Learning

Lesson Objective: Students embrace critical and creative thinking through group work
All Grades / All Subjects / Inquiry
5 MIN

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Discussion and Supporting Materials

Thought starters

  1. See how collaborative inquiry is structured to improve student thinking How does this technique "hand over the responsibility to the learners"?
  2. How does using this strategy at the start of a lesson prepare students for continuous inquiry throughout the lesson?

6 Comments

  • Private message to Denise Duarte
I am excited to use this to stimulate imagination and improve thinking in the classroom and in life beyond it.
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  • Private message to Keesha Stacy
This was exactly the type of collaborative group work I was looking for!
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  • Private message to Lisa Taylor
Great example of collaborative inquiry - thanks for sharing.
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  • Private message to Muhammad Zubair
This can be done at any grade level.Activities like these promotes thinking skills in students.Very well done.THANKS
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  • Private message to Jean Cobb
Great example of collaboration and student centered instruction through inquiry
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Transcripts

  • Summary

    A KS2 class in mixed-ability groups shows how collaborate enquiry can be used to help sharpen thinking and stimulate imagination.

    Summary

    A KS2 class in mixed-ability groups shows how collaborate enquiry can be used to help sharpen thinking and stimulate imagination.
    The Year 3/4 class, from Heather Primary School in Leicestershire, is split into mixed ability groups and asked to look at a photograph of the mineral agate.
    The groups are first asked to consider what they know from the photograph and then what they would like to find out about the image. By building on each others' suggestions, the groups come up with some astute observations.
    Finally, the pupils are asked to what it might be and their discussions lead to some imaginative answers, including the inside of a jelly fish or something inside a body.
    The technique is supported by research which is explained by Philippa Cordingley, director of the Centre for the Use of Research and Evidence in Education.

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