Series Math Routines with Kristin Gray: Third Grade: Which One Doesn't Belong: Third Grade

Math.Practice.MP3

Common core State Standards

  • Math:  Math
  • Practice:  Mathematical Practice Standards
  • MP3:  Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

    Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and--if there is a flaw in an argument--explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

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Math.3.G.A.1

Common core State Standards

  • Math:  Math
  • 3:  Grade 3
  • G:  Geometry
  • A:  Reason with shapes and their attributes
  • 1: 
    Understand that shapes in different categories (e.g., rhombuses, rectangles, and others) may share attributes (e.g., having four sides), and that the shared attributes can define a larger category (e.g., quadrilaterals). Recognize rhombuses, rectangles, and squares as examples of quadrilaterals, and draw examples of quadrilaterals that do not belong to any of these subcategories.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

Which One Doesn't Belong: Third Grade

Grade 3 / Math / Tch DIY
24 MIN
Math.Practice.MP3 | Math.3.G.A.1

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A "Which One Doesn't Belong" routine encourages students to reason about the similarities and differences among a set of numbers, expressions, shapes or images.

Discussion and Supporting Materials

10 Comments

  • Private message to Brianna Dusek

Love how the teacher broke down the different properties and how receptive the students were so quickly. Seems like the students were really able to pick up on this and find the reasonings quickly. The material was concise and neatly presented. The students were engaged and eager to respond. There was such freedom to answer and a no judgment zone from the instructor and the other students.

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  • Private message to Anita Varghese

Hi Kristin, Amazing way to elicit from students different properties of geometric shapes. Loved the concept. This will enable my students to brainstorm and come up with different reasoning. I would like to know whether you start this routine before you start a new concept.Thank you

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  • Private message to Anita Varghese

Hi Kristin, Liked the way the class was conducted. I would like to incooperate this idea in my class. A good way to brainstorm on the similarities and properties of geometric shapes. Would have like to see how the class was concluded. Also wanted to know whether you introduce the math routine before starting on a new concept.

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  • Private message to Dorothy Sharpe
I think the students were very observant of the shapes and they were able to see the differences and explain the reasons why certain shapes did not belong. They talked to partners to examine the shapes further to explain why the shapes were consistent and had different values and inner shapes with similar lines and odd shapes that makes the shapes not belong. They did a great analysis and they were fully engaged in the lesson. I will use these concepts in my math groups.
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  • Private message to Kristin Gray
Hi Janine! Thank you so much! When I was in the classroom, I did a number routine each day. I probably used Number Talks most frequently, 2-3/week, and then changed up the other days with one of the other ones. I found the more I could vary it, the less tired students became of the routines. As far as resources, I listed some that I found helpful in the "Reflection and Resources" PDF on the right hand of this page toward the bottom. For each routine video I did, I put a different resource page based on the routine in the video. I hope that is helpful! Let me know if you have any more questions! -Kristin
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School Details

Shields (Richard A.) Elementary School
910 Shields Avenue
Lewes DE 19958
Population: 723

Data Provided By:

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Teachers

Kristin Gray
Math / Kindergarten 1 2 3 4 5 / Teacher

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