Series Educating for Democracy in the Digital Age: Encouraging Students to Take Action

ELA.SL.9-10.1a

Common core State Standards

  • ELA:  English Language Arts
  • SL:  Speaking and Listening Standards 6-\x80\x9312
  • 9-10:  9th & 10th Grades
  • 1a: 
    Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions
    (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9-\x80\x9310
    topics, texts, and issues, building on others'\x80\x99 ideas and expressing their own
    clearly and persuasively.

    a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under
    study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from
    texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful,
    well-reasoned exchange of ideas.


    b. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making
    (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of
    alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.

    c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the
    current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate
    others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and
    conclusions.

    d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of
    agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their
    own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the
    evidence and reasoning presented.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

|
ELA.SL.9-10.1c

Common core State Standards

  • ELA:  English Language Arts
  • SL:  Speaking and Listening Standards 6-12
  • 9-10:  9th & 10th Grades
  • 1c: 
    Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions
    (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9-10
    topics, texts, and issues, building on others'\x80\x99 ideas and expressing their own
    clearly and persuasively.

    a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under
    study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from
    texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful,
    well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

    b. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making
    (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of
    alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.

    c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the
    current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate
    others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and
    conclusions.


    d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of
    agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their
    own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the
    evidence and reasoning presented.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

|
ELA.RH.9-10.3

Common core State Standards

  • ELA:  English Language Arts
  • RH:  Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies 6-12
  • 9-10:  9th & 10th Grades
  • 3: 
    Analyze in detail a series of events described in
    a text; determine whether earlier events caused
    later ones or simply preceded them.

Download Common Core State Standards (PDF 1.2 MB)

Encouraging Students to Take Action

Lesson Objective: Work in small groups to research and plan an action project
Grades 9-12 / Social Studies / Civic Engagement
ELA.SL.9-10.1a | ELA.SL.9-10.1c | ELA.RH.9-10.3

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Discussion and Supporting Materials

Thought starters

  1. What are the benefits of having students choose their own research topics?
  2. How does the tree diagram help students think about root causes and effects of the contemporary problems they're researching?
  3. How do civic engagement lessons prepare students for their futures?

45 Comments

  • Private message to Elizabeth Owonikoko

This lesson is so real because it addresses real-life issues. Allowing students to first research individually before breaking into their various groups to sort and hatch through their ideas as each group focused on a particular issue. I love how the students collaborate to find out the root cause, problems caused, how those problems have spread into society, and how they can contribute to addressing those problems. In this video, every student's voice was heard and no one was judged for his/her ideas. It promotes healthy deliberations and problem-solving skills. It allows the students to engage in critical thinking which is the evidence that students have learned.

Recommended (0)
  • Private message to Jaclyn Sadiker
-How is his lesson authentic to students? His lesson is authentic to students because students have to solve real life problems to make things into a better place. Students have the choice of topic, so they can focus on what they like. They become more engaged. -How does the classroom environment help students to take risks in what they are researching? Students worked in small groups and were the experts of their problem. This increases confidence and students are able to help each other out. They were able to take risks and argue about their topics is a constructive manner. -Name some of the specific "pressures" students were referring to. Why is it significant to research these topics? Some of the pressures were the pressure to succeed, think into a certain way, bullying, to do well and the pressure in school. -What evidence in the video proves students are truly engaged? Students were actively engaged through student conversation, tree diagrams, and questions being asked within the discussion.
Recommended (1)
  • Private message to Michele Kreppein
-How is his lesson authentic to students? Mr. Colley has created lesson for his students, where they are given real life problems. What makes this lesson uniques is the students are not assigned a problem. They are able to choose what issues that are important and are interesting to them. What makes his lesson -How does the classroom environment help students to take risks in what they are researching? The students work in small groups. The students will introduced their idea to their group members.. The students can here have a discussion and hear what others think and say. They would then work together to create a poster on their topic. -Name some of the specific "pressures" students were referring to. Why is it significant to research these topics? Some of the specific pressure students’ referred to were- pressure to succeed, to conform to a certain way of thinking. These are large issues that all students and people today face day to day, whether from society, friends, family, etc. -What evidence in the video proves students are truly engaged? The students were given the freedom to come up with their own ideas. They were actively engaged within their groups, their discussion among their peers and their tree diagrams were filled with information.
Recommended (0)
  • Private message to Lauren Vitiello
Students learned to work in groups that allowed them to make positive impacts within their own lives, which makes it meaningful and applies to their learning. This classroom environment was conducive to group work. Students felt comfortable to take risks. The teacher aided the students during discussions. During group work, some students agreed and others disagreed which was okay! Some of the specific pressures students referred to were police brutality, access to healthy foods, and pressure on Asians to do well academically. This is something that affects the students lives and would be something that they would be interested in discussing. Students were engaged. This was noticed through discussions, visual charts, questions within the groups.
Recommended (0)
  • Private message to Lauren Legotti
-How is his lesson authentic to students? Students have to learn to work in groups in order to make positive impacts in their world, which makes it meaningful and applicable to their learning. -How does the classroom environment help students to take risks in what they are researching? Students must feel comfortable and safe to take risks. They must feel that they are supported in order to collaborate effectively and not be afraid to fail. -Name some of the specific "pressures" students were referring to. Why is it significant to research these topics? Police brutality and Asians to do well academically. This is something that effects the students lives and would be something that they would be interested in discussing. -What evidence in the video proves students are truly engaged? Student discussions and questions show that they were on topic and interested.
Recommended (0)

School Details

Oakland Technical High School
4351 Broadway
Oakland CA 94611
Population: 2016

Data Provided By:

greatschools

Teachers

Matthew Colley
English Language Arts Social Studies / 9 / Teacher

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